K9 Ryder awarded overdose and trauma kit

BLACKFOOT, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) - A Blackfoot Police Department K9 has been awarded a Naloxone/Narcan overdose kit and trauma kit. 

K9 Ryder, a Belgian Malinois and German Shepherd mix, and Officer Chad Braswell received the kit by K9s of Valor.

The Naloxone overdose kit comes with a NarCase which will allow Officer Braswell to carry it on his duty belt ready to go. This kit will reverse the effects of an overdose due to exposure from dangerous drugs such as fentanyl, and the trauma kit will treat major traumatic injuries until they can reach an emergency veterinarian hospital. 

If you would like to donate to sponsor a K-9 unit in need, go HERE.

https://www.localnews8.com/news/blackfoot/blackfoot-police-department-k9-awardednaloxone-overdose-kit/704243986

K9s of Valor offers $500 reward for return of missing K9

UNIVERSAL CITY - A non-profit that works with law enforcement K9 officers is asking the public for help finding a K9 officer that was last seen in the Universal City area.

According to K9s of Valor, K9 Warrant, who works for the City Live Oak disappeared early Sunday morning in the Universal City area.

The brindle colored Dutch Shepard is 2 years old and weighs approximately 70 pounds. 

"Please be on the look out and pray K9 Warrant is located safe," K9s of Valor said in a Facebook post.

A representative for K9s of Valor said the group will pay a $500 reward for the safe return of K9 Warrant.

Those who have seen Warrant are asked to call the Live Oak Police Department at 210-653-0033.

UPDATE: Live Oak Police Department's missing K9 has been found!

https://www.ksat.com/news/authorities-looking-for-police-k9-last-seen-in-universal-city-area

Facing death row, pit bull becomes police dog

Jasper the pit bull was running out of chances. He arrived at the Prince William County animal shelter about six months ago, an injured stray possibly hit by a car. He recovered and got adopted – twice. Each time, his new owners returned him.

“Unfortunately, he's one of those dogs that's just fantastic, but he's also kind of challenging,” said Jill Gregory, center manager for the Prince William Humane Society, which works with county animal control to pull pets from the shelter and help get them adopted.

Gregory said she went to the shelter for her weekly pull, where a staff member took her aside and told her about Jasper, a pit bull mix who’s about 2 years old.

“She said there’s this dog, he’s been in and out, we think he’s been hit by a car, he’s really high energy,” Gregory said.

She took him to the humane society's facility in Dumfries, where the organization opened a storefront for pet adoptions last year.

There, animal care workers found Jasper intelligent, loyal and driven, particularly when it came to a ball. But he was “extreme high energy” and frustrated.

After an accidental bite with an animal-care worker, it looked like Jasper’s time had run out.

“We were really hoping we’d be able to do more for him, but we ended up having the same issues,” Gregory said. “We were kind of at our wit’s end.”

That’s when Prince William Humane Society president Lori Leary reached out to Nick White, who owns Off-Leash K9 Training. White’s team performed two evaluations with Jasper and saw big potential.

“They said ‘We could do so much with this dog. He could be a police dog,’” Gregory said. “I’m just here thinking he’s an awesome dog, so smart. But in this environment, there’s not much more to do but look cute and hope someone takes them home.”

White contacted the Throw Away Dogs Project, which specializes in “repurposing, training and relocating unique dogs to positively impact our communities.” The Pennsylvania-based nonprofit took Jasper on and trained him to be a drug detection dog.

He and his new handler, Kennard police Deputy Chief Don Crabtree, are learning their new roles together and experiencing a lot of firsts. Jasper is Crabtree’s first police canine, as well as a first for the small town police force. And while Jasper is trained to sniff out cocaine, heroin, meth and ecstasy, he’s still undergoing training for certification in Indiana, where he is believed to be the state’s first pit bull police dog.

“What he’s waiting for is for me to catch up to him,” Crabtree said.

In the meantime, the new partners have already established a strong bond, and Jasper seems to love life with a job to do.

Crabtree admits he didn’t know what to expect when he first met Jasper.

“I didn’t know if I was going to get him home and he was going to wreak havoc,” he said. “I’ve never owned a pit bull, but I wouldn’t trade him in for any other breed. You can look in his eyes and see the love there. We’re definitely bonded. This guy won’t let me do anything alone.”

Jasper has received a big welcome in Kennard, a smaller community with no budget for a drug-detection dog, but – like many communities – struggling with a drug problem. Crabtree is paying Jasper’s expenses out of his own pocket for now.

The newest member of the force has a following on Kennard’s Facebook page, and even his own Instagram account (instagram.com/k9.jasper)

“The number one goal is to make the community safe,” Crabtree said. “The type of place were people can go home and leave the front door unlocked. With the community’s help, we can make that happen. Jasper fits right in to that plan.”

Picture is K9 Jasper with his Narcan overdose kit donated by K9s of Valor

https://www.insidenova.com/headlines/facing-death-row-pit-bull-becomes-police-dog/article_22b47046-d4ea-11e8-bbd3-d77ecc873d3f.html


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NPD K-9 Smokey receives overdose reversal kit

It started when the Jasper County Sheriff’s Office offered a training session to help track down criminals, attended by several K-9 officers.

In late September, a K-9 officer who went to a training session held by the Jasper County Sheriff’s Office brought up a nonprofit organization called K9s of Valor and its program to donate Narcan kits. After learning about this, the Newton Police Department sought out K9s of Valor and was able to get a kit for its K-9 Smokey.

“Due to the narcotic aspect of Smokey’s work, he is at a higher risk of exposure to these drugs. Smokey is much safer on patrol because of the Naloxone kit,” said Newton Police Officer Zach Walker, Smokey’s handler. “Newton Police Department is very grateful to K9s of Valor.”

K9s of Valor provides Naloxone and trauma kits for K-9s with no cost to law enforcement agencies. Their purpose is to donate the equipment necessary to keep K-9 officers and their dogs as safe as possible.

One of the dangers of the job is exposure to carfentanyl and fentanyl, reportedly the most recent increasing epidemic in drug use. Exposure to a very small amount of these drugs can be fatal. These effects can be reversed by the drug Naloxone.

“It is becoming more commonplace for law enforcement officers to carry Naloxone on their person in case they are exposed,” Walker said.

Smokey was chosen by the NPD in late 2015. The dog came from a training facility called Midwest K9 in central Iowa.

During the following months, Walker and Smokey had four weeks of K-9 training through Midwest K9 together. They also did some fundraising within Newton to help their K-9 program.

“Smokey and I have been working on patrol since May 2016,” Walker said.

Smokey’s main job with the NPD involves tracking and narcotics. He is deployed on vehicles that have been stopped on a traffic stop, where he can sniff and detect the odor narcotics such as methamphetamine, heroin, cocaine and marijuana.

“If Smokey can detect the odor of a narcotic from the outside of a vehicle, it can be searched,” Walker said.

Smokey is also responsible for tracking suspects on the run by picking up their scent. This is used mainly for suspects who flee from police officers, as well as with missing people or children.

“Smokey is a benefit to the department, increasing the efficiency of tracking persons and locating illegal narcotics,” Walker said.



https://www.newtondailynews.com/2019/01/02/npd-k-9-smokey-receives-overdose-reversal-kit/a8b7l55/

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Clackamas Sheriff's K9 recovers from heroin exposure, receives new Narcan kit

A donated Narcan kit for K9s came in handy after a Clackamas County Sheriff's drug-detection dog ran afoul of some contraband in the local jail.

The kit saved K9 Abbie’s life after she ingested some heroin during a jail cell search. She started showing symptoms like rapid head shaking, excessive saliva, and rapid blinking.

Fortunately, K9 Grimm’s handler, Deputy McGlothin, had a Narcan kid specifically for dogs. He brought it to the jail.

K9 Abbie has since made a full recovery, and is already back at work.

Both Abbie and Grimm now each have their own kit after the group “K9s of Valor” donated Narcan kits to their handler officers.

https://katu.com/news/local/clackamas-sheriffs-k9-recovers-from-heroin-exposure-receives-new-narcan-kit

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Officer Uses K9s of Valor Narcan Kit on K9

A K9 officer in Oregon was administered an overdose reversal drug after she was exposed to heroin. 

The Clackamas County Sheriff's Office says that at approximately 7:30 p.m. on August 7th, K9 Abbie and handler Deputy Eliseo Ramos were conducting a search for contraband at the Clackamas County Jail. The dog alerted on smuggled heroin on top of a hygiene container under a table.

However, during the search, the sheriff's office says that the container spilled over and Abbie was exposed to the heroin. Abbie began exhibiting signs of drug exposure, including excessive saliva, rapid head shaking, and rapid blinking.

K9 Grimm's handler, Deputy McGlothin, reportedly was able to deliver a special Narcan kit for the dogs to the Jail to administer nasally to K9 Abbie. The Narcan successfully stabilized Abbie and she was transported to the VCA Animal Hospital for treatment. She was held for observation overnight and released the next morning.

See more about the incident below.

http://www.fox35orlando.com/fast-five/k9-exposed-to-heroin-in-jail-is-administered-narcan

Narcan and Trauma Kit Donated

 

POINT PLEASANT — Its been said a dog’s nose, knows. For K9s, those noses can get into some dangerous situations.

This is why Jerry, a K9 with the Mason County Sheriff’s Department, was recently awarded a Naloxone/Narcan overdose reversal kit and trauma kit by the group K9s of Valor.

K9s of Valor, located in Texas, is an all volunteer, 501c(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to provide life saving and essential equipment such as K-9 trauma kits, Narcan overdose reversal kits and Hot-N-Pop vehicle heat alarms to help keep police dogs throughout the country safe.

Mason County Sheriff’s Department K9 Officer, Deputy Justin Veith, heard about the program through a fellow deputy in Brook County. The Narcan and trauma kits were free of charge to the department and Jerry.

Veith said it makes sense to have the Narcan kit for Jerry, as he is an officer with the department. Human deputies in the department now carry Narcan as well, should it be needed for accidental exposure to powerful opioids or to assist saving a civilian’s life.

“Obviously, his (Jerry’s) nose is better than our’s,” Veith pointed out, adding Jerry uses that nose to do his job; his job that entails sniffing out narcotics which makes him vulnerable to exposure.

These days, coming into contact with heroin or fentanyl can be deadly without the opioid reversing medication, Naloxone found in Jerry’s kit from K9s of Valor.

“A K9 is another police officer,” Sheriff Greg Powers said about the value the department places on the animals. “They are a tool we use for fighting drugs. We don’t want to lose a K9 partner because of a drug overdose.”

Drug overdoses have become an all too common sight, not only for EMS personnel but now law enforcement. Powers reported Veith recently had to use Narcan on an unresponsive passenger in a vehicle along U.S. 35 to revive the person, possibly saving their life.

Now four years old, Jerry is equipped with a bulletproof and stab-proof vest (also raised with donations to the department) as he works the county with Veith. The trauma kit will come in handy should Jerry ever get wounded and Veith need to apply first aid until he can receive vet care.

In addition to finding all manner of drugs on people, in packages and in hidden compartments in vehicles, Jerry also tracks and can do take downs of suspects. Jerry is a four-legged crime deterrent tool, Veith said. Suspects often become cooperative when it comes to giving up alleged drugs before the dog begins its search of a vehicle. Also, suspects hiding from law enforcement often will give themselves up if they know the dog is about to be turned loose to locate them.

One of Jerry’s more recent, bigger busts was assisting the Mason Police Department in finding 14 grams of suspected methamphetamine. Jerry and Veith often assist other departments and can visit clubs and organizations to give demonstrations on how Jerry works, as do the other K9 officers with the department which include Deputy Ferrell and Lt. Troy Stewart. Jerry’s even attended a Halloween party at Petland of Gallipolis, Ohio which donates dog food to the K9. Like his human counterparts, he’s become well known in the community he serves.

Once off duty, Jerry goes home with Veith and becomes the family pet but now, thanks to the Narcan and trauma kits, he has a better chance of making it home each night.

POINT PLEASANT — Its been said a dog’s nose, knows. For K9s, those noses can get into some dangerous situations.

This is why Jerry, a K9 with the Mason County Sheriff’s Department, was recently awarded a Naloxone/Narcan overdose reversal kit and trauma kit by the group K9s of Valor.

K9s of Valor, located in Texas, is an all volunteer, 501c(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to provide life saving and essential equipment such as K-9 trauma kits, Narcan overdose reversal kits and Hot-N-Pop vehicle heat alarms to help keep police dogs throughout the country safe.

Mason County Sheriff’s Department K9 Officer, Deputy Justin Veith, heard about the program through a fellow deputy in Brook County. The Narcan and trauma kits were free of charge to the department and Jerry.

Veith said it makes sense to have the Narcan kit for Jerry, as he is an officer with the department. Human deputies in the department now carry Narcan as well, should it be needed for accidental exposure to powerful opioids or to assist saving a civilian’s life.

“Obviously, his (Jerry’s) nose is better than our’s,” Veith pointed out, adding Jerry uses that nose to do his job; his job that entails sniffing out narcotics which makes him vulnerable to exposure.

These days, coming into contact with heroin or fentanyl can be deadly without the opioid reversing medication, Naloxone found in Jerry’s kit from K9s of Valor.

“A K9 is another police officer,” Sheriff Greg Powers said about the value the department places on the animals. “They are a tool we use for fighting drugs. We don’t want to lose a K9 partner because of a drug overdose.”

Drug overdoses have become an all too common sight, not only for EMS personnel but now law enforcement. Powers reported Veith recently had to use Narcan on an unresponsive passenger in a vehicle along U.S. 35 to revive the person, possibly saving their life.

Now four years old, Jerry is equipped with a bulletproof and stab-proof vest (also raised with donations to the department) as he works the county with Veith. The trauma kit will come in handy should Jerry ever get wounded and Veith need to apply first aid until he can receive vet care.

In addition to finding all manner of drugs on people, in packages and in hidden compartments in vehicles, Jerry also tracks and can do take downs of suspects. Jerry is a four-legged crime deterrent tool, Veith said. Suspects often become cooperative when it comes to giving up alleged drugs before the dog begins its search of a vehicle. Also, suspects hiding from law enforcement often will give themselves up if they know the dog is about to be turned loose to locate them.

One of Jerry’s more recent, bigger busts was assisting the Mason Police Department in finding 14 grams of suspected methamphetamine. Jerry and Veith often assist other departments and can visit clubs and organizations to give demonstrations on how Jerry works, as do the other K9 officers with the department which include Deputy Ferrell and Lt. Troy Stewart. Jerry’s even attended a Halloween party at Petland of Gallipolis, Ohio which donates dog food to the K9. Like his human counterparts, he’s become well known in the community he serves.

Once off duty, Jerry goes home with Veith and becomes the family pet but now, thanks to the Narcan and trauma kits, he has a better chance of making it home each night.

 

 

ttp://www.mydailyregister.com/news/27146/protecting-all-the-officers-k9-trauma-narcan-overdose-reversal-kits-provided

Arkansas K9s receive lifesaving Narcan kits

PARAGOULD, AR (KAIT) -

As the opioid and heroin epidemic continues to grip the country, it's not just officers who need to be careful when they come in contact with drugs. Their K9 partners can suffer from an overdose as well. 

The national nonprofit, K9s of Valor, hosted a Giving Tuesday campaign to provide life-saving medication to K9's across the country. 

The Paragould Police Department will benefit from that, receiving Narcan overdose kits for their two K9 officers. 

Those kits have the same drug in them that are used to prevent overdoses in humans. 

The dogs can experience overdoses just like humans, by coming in contact with or inhaling too much of a narcotic. 

"K9s, especially working interdiction on highways or specifically narcotic investigations, they desperately need those," said Lt. Scott Snyder with the Paragould Police Department. "They're a tool, they're our partners same as our human partners are and we want to do everything we can to keep them alive and keep them safe."

The Narcan kits should be in sometime next week. 

A vet will then train Paragould's two K9 handlers to administer the drug to the dogs. 

The kits cost about $70 each. 

The Pocahontas Police Department also recently found out that their K9 officer, Raiden, will be getting both an overdose kit and a trauma kit. 

A generous donor in Colorado paid the $120 bill for that. 

 

http://www.kait8.com/story/36957067/life-saving-overdose-kits-provided-for-k9-officers

Opiod Crisis and K9s of Valor

America’s growing opioid crisis isn’t only impacting people – it’s also causing police K9s to overdose. As a precaution, as I wrote in July, some police dog handlers across the country now carry naloxone, a drug that reverses opioid overdoses. However, many police departments don’t have the budget to provide K9s with these lifesaving drugs.

To help save the lives of police dogs, Nate King of Texas founded the nonprofit K9s of Valor last year, which provides, free of charge, naloxone, trauma kits, vehicle heat alarms and K9 care packages to police departments. He took the time to answer some questions about this organization.

What inspired you to start K9s of Valor?

Ever since I was a young child, it has always been my dream to become a police officer and I have always had a love for dogs. I am currently a police dispatcher and in the process of becoming an officer. Several years ago, I rescued a German shepherd, Zeus. Our bond was exactly the close bond that K9 handlers have with their partners – indescribable, really. Having Zeus increased my passion for wanting to become a K9 officer.

In January 2016, K9 Jethro with the Canton, Ohio Police Department was shot and killed in the line of duty after entering a local business on a burglary-in-progress call. For the next few weeks, I researched how we can help keep police K9s safe.

I found that police departments do not have the proper budget for K9 units. K9 officers have to rely on the community donating or, more often than not, the officers are paying for the supplies out of their own pocket.

K9s of Valor was launched to help keep police K9 officers safe by providing lifesaving equipment at no charge to law enforcement. We are a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that’s completely run by volunteers who have a love for dogs and keeping these courageous officers safe.

 

What is K9s of Valor doing to help protect these dogs?

K9s of Valor donates lifesaving equipment such as trauma kits and naloxone overdose kits to police K9 units across the country at no cost to officers. If the K9 or officer is exposed to dangerous opioids such as heroin or fentanyl, a naloxone overdose kit will reverse the effects of the overdose. Both of these opioids are extremely deadly — just the touch or exposure of the drug can lead to an overdose. The naloxone acts as an opioid antagonist and reverses the actions of opioids.

How soon after you started K9s of Valor did you begin getting requests for naloxone overdose kits?

The requests did not start until August 2017, and the reason was the skyrocketing increase of heroin overdoses in the country. Officers are seeing overdoses every day and coming in contact with these dangerous drugs.

Have these requests been increasing?

Our requests for naloxone kits started coming in slowly, until more and more departments started hearing about our donations. In the beginning, we would receive on average two to three requests a week. Now we receive two to three requests almost every day from K9 officers across the country.

We continue to get requests for trauma kits, and dozens of departments are interested in vehicle heat alarms. We still assist as often as we can with these, but our focus right now is naloxone kits due to so many departments in need and very few nonprofit organizations assisting with these.

What is being done to protect police dogs from overdosing?

Officers across the country are changing the way they conduct searches. Some will not send their dog to freely search the area. For example, on a traffic stop, if the K9 alerts on the outside of a vehicle, the officer may not have their dog search inside the car. Instead the officer will scan the area and search by hand. With searching houses, if the officer believes fentanyl or heroin is involved, some will not even allow the K9 to be involved and will search it by hand as well.

Dogs get much closer to the narcotics, so officers are paying extremely close attention. A touch or simply breathing in the smallest amount of fentanyl or heroin — the amount of a few grains of salt — can lead to an overdose. Officers are much more cautious because of these dangerous drugs on the rise.

 

https://www.care2.com/causes/k9s-of-valor-is-helping-police-departments-save-four-legged-heroes.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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K9s of Valor grants Idaho State Trooper K9 unit with life saving equipment

OSBURN — It is no secret that Shoshone County has struggled with a drug problem for some time now. 

Drug related incidents are among the top five report offenses in our county, according to Idaho State Police’s (ISP) 2016 crime report. 

In an area where sniffing out (pun intended) harmful and illegal substances is key to keeping them off the streets, it is important that our only resident drug detection K9 have the tools to be safe. 

Kevin Kessler, ISP Trooper, and his drug detection K9, Ace, have been serving the Silver Valley for some time now. 

Ace has made the front page of the News-Press more than once for his work — most recently for an incredibly large marijuana seizure on I-90 last year. 

Like a dog with a bone (OK, I’ll stop after this one), Ace and Kessler work tirelessly to make our community better in their own way. 

But like with any law enforcement job, there are always risks to ones health. 

Kessler said that the most common opiate that he and Ace (and law enforcement in general) come across nowadays is heroin. 

“Now, drug cartels are lacing heroin with fentanyl (an opioid pain medication) and even carfentanil (a synthetic opioid of fentanyl that is 10,000 time stronger than morphine) which are extremely potent and a person or animal can easily overdose.”

For someone who’s job is to stick their nose right next to these substances, this information could be concerning. 

In order to plan for the worst, Kessler and K9’s of Valor (an all volunteer, non-profit organization that raises money and provides equipment to K9 teams) teamed up to acquire a narcan (otherwise known as nalaxone, an opiate antidote) drug overdose kit. 

This kit, Kessler explained, is designed “to provide a one time life saving nasal spray to a dog to reverse the effects of an opioid overdose. The kit includes the Narcan itself and a duty belt holder from Narcase-Tac Life Systems LLC.”

In just one day, the necessary funds were raised through donation and the crime fighting duo should receive the equipment within a week. 

When it comes to the charity of others though, sometime you just can’t hold back the flood gates. 

After the funds were raised for the narcan kit, money continued to pour in, so Kessler and Ace will be getting even more helpful gear. 

In addition the overdose kit, they will receive an updated first aid kit outfitted with a K9 first aid aspirator/resuscitator. 

Kessler said that “this new kit could easily save the life of Ace or another dog that has stopped breathing or their heartbeat has stopped. The kit is made by Elite K9 and consists of aspirator/resuscitator pump, large aspirator mask, supplemental oxygen adaptor, resuscitator mask, oxygen recovery mask, and a heavy duty water resistant bag.”

Although Ace has never had any major injuries on the job, you can never be to careful.

“The kits will help Ace and I with our job because if he has a major medical emergency or is exposed to an opioid and begins to overdose,” Kessler explained, “we may not make the trip to the veterinarian before he dies. But with these kits we can make immediate medical care happen.”

Kits such as these are beginning to come standard equipment for K9 units across the county. 

Now, if the worse happens and Ace is exposed to these harmful drugs, he can get the help he needs right away.

If anyone would like to donate to this cause for other K9 teams, go to Facebook and find K9’s of Valor. 

The donations are tax-deductible.

 

 

 

http://www.shoshonenewspress.com/article/20171001/ARTICLE/171009999